Posted by: David | January 27, 2008

Me and You and Everyone We Know

Yeah I’m slow. Only just now, early 2008, am I getting around to Miranda July’s 2005 masterpiece indy film, Me and You and Everyone We Know. I knew there was a reason I put her into my “Neato Web Sites To See” widget. She’s a freakin genius. An artist friend of mine recommended this film so I added it to my Netflix queue. Thanks LKR!!

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Purchasing Sigur Ros Heima album on iTunes last night. Mostly reruns, but I love this kind of music.

I may have actually damaged my brain this afternoon. First I watched the last 15 minutes of the July film, which I’d started yesterday. Then I got on the spinning bike, watched all the deleted scenes, then the whole film over again. Then I came upstairs to wash the dishes and listen to the Sigur Ros album I’d purchased on iTunes last night. Now I’m listening to Radiohead’s In Rainbows as I write this post. My wife’s pretty much done with the NYT crossword puzzle and has not had to use the NYT Crossword Puzzle Dictionary even once. She asked me a couple of things, and since I know approximately 10 to the minus infinity of EVERYTHING, I was able to help her with Yuri Gagarin’s spacecraft: VOSTOK. Sheesh, doesn’t everyone know that? And Owen Meany. She’d had that already, but wasn’t sure ee or ea. It’s because of Miranda that the detail seems important.

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Begonia lives on the left speaker. Feist playing now.

I’d like to rave about the film, but I hate when people do that. So I won’t. But if you decide to try it, please watch it twice. It’s like reality TV, but a fully produced and scripted movie. It has everything in it. Life, death, love, sex, racism, mental illness, children, parents, artists, technology, shoes, everything. And the CD player has started skipping badly on Feist’s Open Season CD. The end.

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Responses

  1. I’ll definitely check the film out. Thanks for the recommendation.

    I was listening to Sigur Ros all week last week. Love them. Good writing music!

  2. I own this film and I’ve never watched it! Wow, I will definitely watch it now. How exciting, to already own something I now want to see.

    Tell me about this Sigur Ros, you guys! Sounds intriguing. And I’m always looking for writing music right now. I’ve been buying the Putumayo Presents collections at the whole foods market, because I’ve found music in a foreign language (and anything other than English is foreign to me) is perfect.

  3. There are a bunch of free downloads of Sigur Ros’ music here: http://www.sigur-ros.co.uk/media/ They’re kind of trippy sounding, not unlike early Pink Floyd.

    They’re an Icelandic band and though some of their music has “lyrics” which the singers freely admit are not real lyrics, but merely musical vocalizations that their fans have come to call “Hopelandic”. Here’s their Q&A page: http://www.sigur-ros.co.uk/band/faq.php

    I hope you like the film. But I’ll be OK if you don’t. Since you claim to have ADD it might be a little slow for you. And you may not find Miranda as cute as I do with her bright blue eyes, clueless poet stare, and parted lips. But I really do recommend watching it twice.

  4. I’m glad you clarified how that movie really has everything in it; seriously, you had me at “shoes” 😉

    PS: have you seen Juno? I feel like you would dig that…anyhoo it’s solid; a very solid flick.

  5. Thanks Romi. Yeah my daughter said I’d like Juno too. That and “Superbad”. Guess I’ll add Juno to my Netflix queue. Just so you know, I never go to the movies and I don’t rent them at the video store. It takes a few years and an act of Congress before I finally see a movie. This works out OK only because 85% of the movies coming out these days are pure crap.

  6. Thanks for the Sigur Ros link, I’ll check them out. And I’m actually big on slow, kind of quiet movies. Lost in Translation, Garden State. I think I’m the only person who actually bought The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou. I’ve seen it about 50 times, I never get tired of it. I bought You and Me and Everyone We Know because I found it in the used bin, and the trailers looked like my cup of tea … but then I forgot about it. I will definitely be watching it tomorrow.

  7. Yea! I’ve seen this movie! It’s quirky.

  8. Quirky is a fair enough critique C. It’s got a lot more dimension to it than your Hollywood stuff, and yet has the essential Hollywood thread of girl meets boy and love wins out in the end. It’s July’s attention to details and minutiae that captivates me.

    Thanks Wendy for 2 more to add to Netflix queue. I liked Lost in Translation too, in all its languorous writhing splendor. But I’ve been a Bill Murray fan forever. Please give your critique of Me and You and Everyone We Know. I’ll be surprised if you don’t like it, but I’ll get over it.

  9. And who lives on the other speaker? Do you mean to say that the Begonia is sad?

    I don’t watch movies except High Noon and The Great Dictator. As I could not get High Noon for a long time, I kept imagining the horses that I would see one day. Now that the next door library owns a copy, I have watched the film many times. There aren’t almost any horses.

    I can’t believe that those are the only 2 movies you watch! There is nothing on top of the other speaker- it’s trapped in a kind of cabinet thingy with the rest of the ancient stereo equipment.

  10. As I am new on this site I have been read old posts, and one, “Love’s Labor (Day) Lost” was about a “cairn” on the side of the road. What is a cairn? The dictionary says it is a memorial mound. Do you mean those stones are pre-history?

  11. Ah, the cairn. The post you refer to was written after this micromonument was toppled by hooligans. Or vagabonds. Or other malignant wayfarers.

    I had been photographing this cairn often on bike rides. Nothing prehistoric here, just a random act of quality by another traveler on this road. I posted later about meeting the Builder himself.

    The wikipedia litsts memorializing first among the various purposes of stone cairns. This cairn’s purpose is memorial too I guess … “I was here”.

  12. I see. And you met the builder himself. But the base of this monument looks like a wide bench made of a big piece of stone, even granite. There is an immense monastery-like building near Madrid built by a famous king. He was a world ruler and wanted to get out. He ordered a bench like that cut into stone for him so that he could sit and watch the builders. So I thought that bench was similar as a place to sit and rest and watch the traffic coming around that curve and the grass growing.

  13. Nice observations cantueso. I think the bench is a large chunk of the ledge that was probably put flat by a huge excavating machine so that the cairn builder could construct his little rockpile then sit and watch the travelers pass. Just like that king of yours.

  14. hey dave – what are those red berries on your new header? are they currants? they’re gorgeous.

  15. Yes, that new header is magnificent. Please tell us about the berries.

  16. Thanks! I like the way the sunlight plays on the stone behind the berries. Sadly, perhaps, the berries are totally artificial. It’s this like 8 foot holiday garland my wife bought at Target for $14. They are very real-looking. I had to look at them quite closely to see that they were painted styrofoam beads, wire, paper, jute. Made in China. She’s mad that I’m telling her secrets to you Internet! From the Chinese Fakeberry Bush.

  17. I meant to comment on the header too. It’s wonderful! Your wife should be proud of her Fakeberries.

  18. I like Sigur Ros too. Have you seen the DVD Heima?

    My niece went to Iceland on her honeymoon. They loved it. They ate whale which they didn’t love.

  19. I have not seen Heima. But I did see “Heimat” when PBS aired it some 20+ years ago. Sigur Ros disks I own and love are Taak and ()

    I never ate whale, but I’m going to watch The Squid and the Whale as it just arrived via Netflix today. Ever tried BLUBBER???

    Another Icelandic band that I learned of through commentary on the Dresden Dolls Diary blog is called “Múm”. They are pretty good too. I have a disk of theirs called “Finally We Are No One”.

  20. It is a fact that I have really seen only those 2 movies. I may have seen a few more, but forgot them completely. I don’t have a TV. Sometimes I write down the name of one I would REALLY like to see, but then, somehow, with the passing of time…

  21. @ cantueso: I have to interject here that you’re just fascinating to me. I mean that in a good way. Are there movie theaters near where you live?

    Films are such a big part of our culture, that it’s hard to imagine only seeing two in one’s whole life– even if they don’t have a TV.

  22. Do you not like the medium of cinema cantueso? We are oversaturated with that kind of media here in the USA.

    I ignore about 99.9% of the films released and never go to movies or rental stores. Netflix was a gift subscription and has helped me get caught up with some of the stuff people have been recommending lately.

  23. Moonbeam, David:

    There is a movie theater, a big one, right across the street. Also, I forgot to mention Almodovar’s “Speak to her” for its music. But that is really all. I had always wanted to see “High Noon” because of its title. When I finally did see it, it was incredibly strange and funny, incredibly funny the preacher and the Mayor and the shooting and the bad boys waiting for the train. So I watched it quite a few times over. — And I would have liked to see a film named after a big city in North Africa, because it is such a referent and people online always say that they are similar to its main actor. I tried to watch that film but could not understand it in either English or Spanish. The same happened with some Woody Allens: much too fast for me to follow.

  24. Casablanca.

    I got that in a second with the following search keys: “movie North Africa old famous”

    !!!!

    (I foregot to also look up the name of that main actor. He is or was SUCH an important factor in people’s ideas of themselves)

  25. Humphrey Bogart- He played lots of smart alec tough guys. He was one of the early “anti-hero” characters in America’s Hollywood psyche.


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